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Combat Stress launches new mental health magazine

Combat Stress, the UK’s leading charity for veterans’ mental health, has relaunched its magazine which now aims to help anyone struggling with mental health problems.

Available to download from the charity’s website, the magazine Combat Stress features interviews, lifestyle features and advice on how to take good care of your mental health.

The autumn issue focuses on self-care and includes tips on how to get a better night’s sleep, a simple exercise to relax your mind, a guide to how physical activity can help mental wellbeing, and interviews with TV presenter and journalist Susanna Reid and blogger Emily Reynolds.

For almost a century, the charity has helped former servicemen and women deal with trauma-related mental health problems such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Over this time Combat Stress has gained experience and specialist knowledge which it now wants to share with a wider audience.

Sue Freeth, Chief Executive of Combat Stress, said:

“The Combat Stress magazine has always been a great way for us to showcase the work we’re doing to transform the lives of veterans who come to us for help. We made the decision to relaunch our magazine as we want to empower anyone living with PTSD or other mental health problems, to help them better understand and manage their conditions.

“We know that invisible illnesses can be just as hard to cope with as physical ones and we hope our new magazine will help to raise awareness of mental health problems.”

Combat Stress worked with design company Studio Texture, to review, develop and produce its refreshed magazine.

Stuart Youngs, Creative Director at Studio Texture, said:

“Public conscience and understanding of mental health issues is better than it’s ever been. But there’s still a long way to go. With Combat Stress, our opportunity was to help further and deepen this understanding with an even broader audience.

“We didn’t want to look like a typical charity magazine, but we also didn’t want to stray too far from the cause Combat Stress is fighting for – because this gives everything we advocate and share within the magazine credibility and authority our readers can trust. After all, Combat Stress has been dealing with the extremes of mental health concerns, across generations, for almost 100 years.

“We’re delighted with the outcome. An insightful, accessible and fresh way of tackling often challenging subject matter, creating a valuable resource for those suffering with mental health, their families and broader society.”